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LaPrincess Brewer

Dr. LaPrincess Brewer considers the heart a masterpiece of engineering. But her daily inspiration comes from her patients

After winning the TYLENOL® Future Care Scholarship, LaPrincess Brewer earned a degree in chemical engineering at Howard University. But it was her summer internships -- first at Duke University Medical Center, then at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine -- that made her realize her true calling was healthcare. “I realized I was looking for something that would allow me to work for the greater good of society and have interactions with people,” she says today. “I decided that healthcare would let me achieve those goals. People would be the focus of my medical ambitions.”

She went on to earn her doctorate in medicine from George Washington University and a master of public health from Johns Hopkins University, where she began working with local African-American churches to promote health and wellness in her community. She developed an interest in cardiology partly because of her interest in the heart, which she calls an “engineering masterpiece,” but also because of the field’s natural ties to public health. “I felt that going into cardiology, and having a focus on prevention, would be the perfect backdrop for my career,” she explains, “since preventive cardiology is so closely tied with public health.” 

Today Brewer is a cardiology fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where she is continuing her work with African-American churches. “I’ve created a program to educate them about cardiovascular disease risk factors,” she says. “I try to enlighten them on ways to incorporate healthy lifestyle practices into their daily lives, so they can prevent heart disease.”

Brewer considers this work to be the fulfillment of a lifelong goal. “Personally, being from an underserved community, I have always wanted to give back,” she says. “It definitely gives me a sense of pride. It gives me a sense of fulfillment, being able to take what I’ve learned as a medical doctor and apply that to those that I’m serving in the community.”